Tags

, , , , , , , , , ,

Originally posted November 15, 2011, on the now-defunct Mid-Century Vibe blog.

Hutch filled with melamine dishes, in the Cooler at Rural Origins Antiques, Royalton, MN. November 2011.

Hutch filled with melamine dishes, in the Cooler at Rural Origins Antiques, Royalton, MN. November 2011.

What could be more mid-century than Melmac? When we started on this mid-century venture, we gave no thought to Melmac. It was all Fire King this and atomic lamp that. And then we started spotting Melmac, which is a brand name for melamine dishes, and went ape for it, as you can see by the contents of the hutch pictured above …. and the one below.

The upper shelf in this pic shows pink and white melamine coffee cups and saucers and a sugar bowl and creamer. The other dishes are NOT melamine. October 2011.

The upper shelf in this pic shows pink and white melamine coffee cups and saucers and a sugar bowl and creamer. The other dishes are NOT melamine. October 2011.

 

Melmac came in lots of  fun colors and patterns. Dishes made of melamine were considered everyday dishes because they could be knocked around and were hard to break. True Melmac was made by the American Cyanamid Company, but other companies made dishes out of melamine resin. We have melamine dishes by Boonton, Texasware, Branchell, Westinghouse, Prolon, Watertown, Allied Chemical, and even one by Fostoria. There are also a number of melamine pieces that are unmarked.

The Fostoria piece we have (top picture, second shelf, light turquoise bowl on far right) is unusual in that Fostoria is commonly known for glass, but produced melamine for a portion of one year. (The year may have been 1958, but we can’t pin down a source on that.)

Come on in to Rural Origins Antiques in Royalton, MN, and check out our collection of Melmac. Items come in a variety of prices.

—–

Here are a couple of extra online sources related to Melmac:

[iramency.hubpages.com] Collecting Vintage Melmac Dinnerware: History and Information

Retro Chalet: Melmac Central