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I mentioned not long ago here on The Woo Woo Teacup Journal that Hubby and I were trying our hand at the antiques business, renting space from a friend of ours at Rural Origins Antiques in Royalton, MN.

This past weekend was spent setting up our space. Each dealer can lease an 8 ft. x 8 ft. space on either a month-to-month basis or for 6 months at a time. We’re going with the 6-month option. Dealers can also rent a bigger space at a higher cost. Currently, I think all the spaces are rented out.

Erik went on a motorcycle benefit ride Saturday while I got going on our space. I knew the toughest part was going to be the backdrop and I had been thinking about what I wanted to do and how I wanted to do it all week.

Hubby had purchased an old metal gazebo that has beautiful decorative panels. We wanted to use those as part of the backdrop, but I also wanted to add color behind them by using fabric. How to hang the fabric and securely attach the metal panels?

I thought I could take an 8-foot board, or maybe a slightly longer board, and secure it to the top of the peg board display cases that defined our space. I figured I could drill holes into the board as needed and use zip ties to fasten it down. Then I could fasten the metal gazebo panels to the board. I rooted around the basement and found an 8-foot, one-by-two-and-a-half. Even though it wasn’t quite as long as I wanted, I thought I could make it work.

We’ve been making curtains for most of our married lives, changing them out in the living room and dining room whenever we get sick of a color or pattern. There were some gorgeous deep turquoise ones kicking around the house that used to hang in our dining room. They are a tad faded on a couple of edges, but the discoloration isn’t noticeable when they are arranged correctly. They are tab-top curtains (yes, made by us) and I was hoping the tab-tops would slide onto the board. I tested to be sure and they did.

Erik helped me load two of the metal panels and the board into the car. I grabbed the curtains, drill, and my tool box and was off.

Even though the board was too short to rest on top of the peg board display cases, I managed to pull a Tim Gunn and “make it work.” The zip ties were just the ticket to hold everything together.

Once I got the backdrop up, it was time to fill the space with what we already had in the store. On Sunday morning, Erik and I returned to bring more stuff and add finishing touches. Here’s how our space looked when we left Sunday:

Our space at Rural Origins Antiques in Royalton, MN, August 28, 2011.

Our space at Rural Origins Antiques in Royalton, MN, August 28, 2011.

I’m pleased with how it turned out. Of course, as items sell, the look will change, which is part of the excitement of the store. Everyday, there’s something different to see.

Here are some gratuitous pictures of the front of the store, in case you’d like to stop in sometime.

Rural Origins Antiques, Royalton, MN, August 28, 2011.

Rural Origins Antiques, Royalton, MN, August 28, 2011.

The front door of Rural Origins Antiques. Note the faux-exposed brick look. The building's owner had this done prior to the store opening. August 28, 2011.

The front door of Rural Origins Antiques. Note the faux-exposed brick look. The building's owner had this done prior to the store opening. August 28, 2011.

The old Larry's Grocery sign hanging out front of Rural Origins Antiques. We love this sign and, yes, the shop used to be a grocery store. August 28, 2011

The old Larry's Grocery sign hanging out front of Rural Origins Antiques. We love this sign and, yes, the shop used to be a grocery store. August 28, 2011

The front window of Rural Origins Antiques, August 28, 2011.

The front window of Rural Origins Antiques, August 28, 2011.

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