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My husband brought me a candy bar wrapper.  Thus . . .

Snickers Nougatocity

Snickers Nougatocity

Yes, it’s another Snickers bar wrapper with a weird word dreamed up by some ad agency on it.  First with the Peanutopolis and now with the Nougatocity.  Try pronouncing Nougatocity without a pronunciation guide.  It looks like Nougat-oh-city, which is odd.  If you put the emphasis on the “to,” it works better.  (Like in the word meritocracy.)  There is a pronunciation guide inside the wrapper, but it’s not quite right because it only shows emphasis on the last syllable.  (Why am I being fussy about an invented ad word?)

Of course, the ad agency also came up with a definition for Nougatocity:

Nougatocity Definition

Nougatocity Definition

In case that’s tough to read, it says: “Nougatocity \ nü-gat-ä-si-tE\ (noun). A heightened yet fleeting state of accomplishment that makes you realize how unbelievably unmotivated you normally are.”  I have to say, this definition is funnier than the one for Peanutopolis, although nougat is sticky, so maybe that state of accomplishment is more than fleeting.

You may now call me a tool.  Silly as this ad campaign is, it’s got me posting about it on my blog.  The Mars company sure has my number.  Really, they do.  Ironically, I’m reading a chapter on data mining in a book about advertising called “Watch This, Listen Up, Click Here” by David Verklin and Bernice Kanner.  If Mars is smart enough to invent this ad campaign, surely it is tracking what is being said about its products online.

Normally, advertising messages are no more than mosquitoes to me.  I swat them away.  But, sometimes, one catches my attention.  This particular one works because it’s quirky and plays with language, even if the definitions of the made-up words are less than satisfying.

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